Leanna Primiani – Reviews

Reviews

about Holy Order: Shaker Dances

Left Coast Chamber Players/Rapido! Composition Contest               San Francisco Conservatory of Music     October 1, 2012

…The theme of the [Rapido! Composition Contest] competition required that all submissions involve dance…Only Leanna Primiani’s Holy Order: Shaker Dances  seemed to honor the spirit of the rules of the game; and, with its episodic structure, hers was the only piece that seemed to fit comfortably into its allotted extent of clock time. It was no surprise that she was selected to compete against the other regional finalists at the National Finals Concert in Atlanta.

Stephen Smoliar, San Francisco Examiner

 

Huffington Post Visionaries Concert article by Jack Meyer   8/11/13

Leanna Primiani’s “Thursdays, Saturdays, and Twice on the Sabbath,” a nod to Shaker prayer sessions, included stomping and shuffling of feet alongside several wind instruments — a composition reminiscent of the work of John Adams.  I thoroughly enjoyed [it] from start to finish.  I thoroughly enjoyed [the] performance from start to finish. I found the introductions – including the inspirations for the pieces — particularly charming.

 

San Francisco Examiner,  Oct. 2, 2012.  Reviewed by Stephen Smollar

…. Only Leanna Primiani’s “Shaker Dances” seemed to honor the spirit of the rules of the game; and, with its episodic structure, hers was the only piece that seemed to fit comfortably into its allotted extent of clock time. It was no surprise that she was selected to compete against the other regional finalists at the National Finals Concert in Atlanta.

 

National Symphony flutist Aaron Goldman, August, 2012

Leanna Primiani has written a wonderfully evocative new piece for the NFA High School Competition. The Black Swan stretches the flute to its extreme registers and dynamics to vividly depict various bird calls. It is reminiscent of Messiaen’s “Le Merle Noir” in its artistic use of the flute to sound like birds. This is a wonderful new addition to our repertoire. – Aaron Goldman, flute soloist

 

Review of SIRENS

February 6, 2009
REVIEW: Slatkin, Ax and orchestra present embarrassment of riches

By Jonathan Neufeld

For The Tennessean

…It served quite well as a sort of light melodic and tonal palate cleanser after the excellent new work of Leanna Primiani.

Primiani’s Sirens opened the night. The piece tells Homer’s story of the Sirens (Odyssey Book XII). “Tell” is not quite the right word. Musically, (and mathematically, Primiani utilizes a Fibonacci series to organize elements of the story according to the Golden Mean) the story unfurls like a ribbon.

Slatkin and the orchestra handled the rhythmic complexities of the piece well. Famously, the sirens’ song is so beautiful and seductive that it lures sailors to shipwreck. Odysseus wants to listen and so has himself bound to the mast of his ship while all of the other sailors put wax in their ears. As he struggles, Odysseus is only bound more tightly to the mast. After building to a climax, an intensely longing solo piccolo calls after Odysseus who can do nothing but strain against his bonds: trumpets lead the orchestra in a static fanfare — unison rhythm on unchanging notes. Primiani’s piece is a model of expressivity within a rigorous form.

http://www.usc.edu/uscnews/stories/12472.html